Guilty but Mentally Ill

Finally, the Hinckley verdict accelerated the adoption of “guilty but mentally ill” verdicts by states. The “guilty but mentally ill” verdict allows mentally ill defendants to be found criminally liable and requires them to receive psychiatric treatment while incarcerated, or, alternatively, to be placed in a mental hospital and then, when they are well enough, to be moved to a prison to serve their sentences. Laws allowing pleas and verdicts of guilty but mentally ill were first adopted in Michigan in 1975, and concurrent with or subsequent to the Hinckley trial were adopted by 12 more states.


Inside Guilty but Mentally Ill